You knew that Little Red Riding Hood simply wanted to get rid of her mother, so that she could sleep with the Big Bad Wolf, and the ferocious hunter, didn’t you? You knew that Little Red Riding Hood’s instinctual drive was to be possessed by the wolf, who would make her a full female – and that because she was a child, this urge was translated into a desire to be devoured by the wolf … didn’t you? Perhaps you knew that Red Riding Hood was a warning by sexually repressed and repressive males in France, that females should beware the sexually predatory male wolf. And that this interpretation still weaves itself through the American psyche in the twentieth century… Red Riding Hood rises from the pages of the book, like a flower unfurling, not yet sure of what awaits her. She has a heavy, fur-lined hood, covering her eyes so she cannot see what the future holds. She is awakening in the land of dreams, looking to become a full woman. Possessed by the wolf with feet of human… Looking at him but not seen to look, ashamed of her own humanity She is female, and she is innocence, but her red cap links her to hell, where the devilish wolf resides in the air. She is destined for possession. She has fallen from grace. The flowers that she once resembled; breathed as, lived as, now shy from her. Her fingers cannot stretch wide enough to catch them. She is grounded now, stuck on the Earth and in Purgatory, yet surrounded by the dream-land. The red foreboding sky always told her of what was inside her. It took a staring human beast to bring it out…